Less is more

  • by 100 Good Things
  • June 3rd, 2015
  • 2015, June

Yoga in Maldives

At a recent yoga inversion workshop to fine tune the art of going upside down, I found myself shedding a heavy fear baggage to nail that elusive incredible lightness of being. Shirshasana, or headstand, the king of yoga poses, has myriad benefits. Perhaps chief among them is defying gravity is great for heart health. It’s a bonus seeing the universe the other way round is great for the skin.

Shirshasana is one pose not to be taken lightly and certainly isn’t the be all and end all for all yoga practitioners. I know better because I have bruised my muscles, bones and ego awfully early in my yoga journey when I was impatient to take off and fly.

There’s a trick to overcoming fear of inversions, Anahata Yoga’s San offered, “You simply stop before you reach the point of being scared.” Sometimes, it’s about just taking two steps and going no further. Repeat two steps daily till ennui sets in – and it will – and the body is ready to stride that extra steps.

Being task-driven is a necessary evil in goal-oriented work environs. The difference, I discovered on the [yoga] mat, is being with the journey enroute to the destination. When you slow down, breathe and be present, you reach your station centered and connected to the core of your being. Instead of going through the motion, bending one leg after another, moving from task to task in a harried manner.

Learning that less is more is fine art. Apply the theory off the mat, to the real world: The next time you are at the supermarket, pay attention to ingredient labels. You will be hard pressed to find something with just a few ingredients, let alone with familiar names you understand and can pronounce. Baking a loaf of bread requires just flour, water, salt and yeast, not an alarming 20 ingredients that read like a toxic chemical soup.

Likewise, a bar of body soap does not require artificial fragrances and questionable additives. The antioxidant-rich soaps at 100 Good Things contain just a few good things, of which silk protein is a major ingredient. Silk protein, a by-product of the silk industry is a natural humectant and actually consists of a string of amino acids that have the same pH balance as the human skin. This gentle soap with just three ingredients effectively cleanses as it nourishes. Paring down to achieve more may just be the one thing this planet needs to eliminate poverty and violence.

To purchase these lovely silk protein soaps, visit 100 Good Things store.

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