One year on, and a SALE

  • by 100 Good Things
  • April 3rd, 2016
  • 2016, April

When was the last time you did something for the first time?

I asked for a window seat at the airline check-in counter when I was on my way home from Thailand two weeks ago. I would never voluntarily sit by the window if I could help it.

From my seat, it appeared the plane was cruising oh-so-slowly or even stationary. Among the voluminous clouds, I spotted another plane nearby. It flew so fast it was out of sight in under a minute. Only the moon, nearly a perfect circle as a full moon was due a few days later, was a constant.

Obviously my plane’s perceived slow motion was a state of mind. You bet passengers in the other plane were musing about their lack of my speed compared to my plane that appeared to be throttling ahead.

There have been many moments in life when I was impatient for progress to happen. With the benefit of hindsight now, I realized so many lessons quietly unfolded while I was busy tapping my feet, waiting for change that’s slow to arrive.

While working on a deeper pose on the yoga mat, it’s not sheer brute strength that will land the body in the final pose. Surrendering so I can bend deeper, I also let go of so many things emotionally and in my physical living space. The change in the latter appears to be more pronounced only because emptiness has vibrations so pure and crisp it refreshes immediately.

The day I opened my newly pared down closet to find only belongings that absolutely spark joy, it dawned on me my life is empty yet full. The change that brought me here was constant. I did not see it until I had the privilege of walking far enough to look back.

So 100 Good Things turns a year young this month. We lost track of time when we were consumed by necessary business. Merchandising. Marketing. Operations. Finance. It has been one steep learning curve after another. Certainly everything felt stagnated when we were wading in deep waters. We got to shore and another journey has just begun.

One year on, the memory of us scrambling at the 11th hour to put finishing touches to the shop is still vivid.

Being an entrepreneur – or mamapreneur – this late in life was a big leap of faith. It would not have been possible without a dedicated yoga self-practice that I draw strength from. Truly. And a deep conviction that sustainability and wellth (wealth + well) are the only way forward. I like to think this is a natural progression from two decades in travel and wellness writing, on top of a lifelong pursuit of natural living.

The short poem pictured in this blog, written in a plane on the way home from Vientiane after I was touched by its profound simplicity, is on the shop window. It is the very founding principle of 100 Good Things. That you and I are weaving seemingly unrelated stories, yet, the burning forests are not only depriving orangutans of their homes, we suffer from ill health as a result of the smoke haze. Biodiversity that took centuries to build is ruined. Ecosystem is disrupted. We are losing bees due to climate change, habitat loss, and wide and rampant use of pesticides.

What is a planet without bees? The scenario would look pretty dismal: very much colorless and we end up with very little on the dining table. The world’s most hardworking creature pollinates at least one-sixth of flowering plants and 400 agricultural plants.

Our raw honey comes from hives in Northern Laos. In this part of the world, farmers naturally practice sustainable agriculture and this in turn ensures that bees that forage wild in the forest build a nectar that is untainted from industrial contaminants. These subsistence farmers are well aware of our interconnectivity. Maintaining a healthy ecosystem ensures there is constant source of nutritious food on the table.

Our range of organic cotton shawls come from Laotian cotton farmers who assiduously practice intercropping which naturally reduce pest population on top of providing nutrient-rich soil. Traditionally in Laos, a blouse woven from organically grown cotton plant is not as much an anomaly as it is in the Western world.

The same can be said of our Kampot peppercorn, where synthetic fertilizers and pesticides are eschewed. The final product enjoys a Protected Geographical Indicator (PGI) status, just like how sparkling wine from the Champagne region can be hailed as champagne. Attaining the PGI status is no mean feat, mind you. There are strict set of agricultural rules and practices to adhere to.

Industrialization, urbanization, greed and insanely fast pace of life have clouded the innate wisdom we have within. Most human beings are so far removed from the natural world that floral and fauna are regarded as a world unto itself. The taller the skyscraper, the wider the disconnect between man and nature, between the mind, body and spirit. The three are intertwined and dis-ease of any sprouts all sorts of diseases.

More than ever, there is an urgency to bridge this divide. The Age of Aquarius has made this possible. Journeying together, this is within reach.

Joan

Founder

We are celebrating our birthday with everybody’s favorite four-letter word, SALE. Enjoy 20% off our ethically and sustainably produced fashion items and all varieties of Kampot peppercorn.

We endeavor to open Monday to Thursday 10am – 4pm. If you don’t work in the Balestier Hill neighborhood, please call/text us to ensure we are around – tel: 9383-1047. Other hours, public holiday and weekend by appointment, with no purchase obligations.

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